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  1. Quarry site visit conducted by the Monitoring Team Checklist for Quarry and Mining Works (PDF, 218 KB)
  2. Application Forms
  3. Quarry and Mining Management Checklist (PDF, 251 KB)
  4. Environmental Impact Assessment
  5. Approved Quarries
  6. Poor Quarry Management Practices (PDF, 352 KB)

 

The following is intended to assist planning authorities and developers when dealing with applications for mining, quarries and other associated industries, and particularly those applications involving Environmental Impact Statements.

Consultations

  • The Physical Planning Act, 2002 (PDF, 228 KB) makes provision for consultations with the planning authority and publicity of applications.
  • The developer should consider at the outset whether the development would be in accordance with the development plan for the area.
  • Owners and operators will be aware of the public concern which certain extractive industry developments can give rise to and should therefore take the earliest opportunity to explain their proposals to the planning authority and to ensure that all relevant planning and environmental issues are fully addressed in any subsequent planning application.
  • They should also discuss significant operational issues, such as working hours and likely traffic volumes, at the pre-application stage. Rehabilitation of the site after the end of extraction should also be considered at the design stage.
  • Prior to the preparation of an Environmental Impact Assessment, a prospective applicant, should request the planning authority to provide terms of reference for the EIA.

Monitoring of Quarry Development

The Physical Planning Division is responsible for the periodic monitoring of quarry operations in the country and is the focal point of the cabinet-approved quarry monitoring team, which is also made up of representatives of the Fisheries, Forestry, Environmental Health Divisions as well as the Environmental Coordinating Unit.

The team conducts visits every 3 – 4 months to all quarry sites with the observations and the recommendations documented in the Quarry Monitoring Form and attached photographs. This form is forwarded to the developer.

In most cases the community living in close proximity to a quarry will be affected by poor management practices of that quarry. The community can play an important role in quarry monitoring and should look for the signs of poor quarry management practices.